Sunday, March 20, 2005

Writing a Self Review

I completed another one of my performance appraisals last Thursday. My best practices for writing self review:

  1. Keep the records straight: I keep aside postive mails, records etc. received over the year in a separate folder. This practice not only helps me remember my accomplishments for the year but also provides enough material to substantiate my claims.


  2. Leave aside unnecessary humility or modesty: My self review states the facts for the year. Places where I have led, taken initiative, influenced a decision are stated as is. A self review document is a business document. Shying from stating acheivements as is can backfire.


  3. Substantiate each claim: If client consulting is my strength. I provide examples justifying this claim. If multitasking is another of my strength, I state the number of courses I worked on, activities I undertook in addition to the project work.


  4. Clearly state next year's goals: I keep the goals for the upcoming year achievable, measurable and aligned to my interest and company's direction. For example, if the company would be venturing into other markets in the coming year, consulting for those markets would be a goal for me since it aligns wonderfully with my interest and company's business direction.


  5. Finally, take the appraisal for what it's worth: In my over six years of professional life. I have come to believe that an appraisal is as good as the manager. Hence, I factor in the integrity and maturity of my manager before entering the appraisal meeting. Some of my enormously talented managers have helped me tap my potential and mature professionally - they congratulated me on my achievments, helped me identify my growth areas and recommended possible solutions and they listened. Some other managers have left me wondering if they ever read my self-review!

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